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Sunday , October , 02 2022
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Welcome to Art's and Culture

Whatever the new ‘normal’ is there’s never been a more poignant and exciting time for arts and culture. Like very thirsty people we’ve all been dreaming of slaking our creative thirst. There’s real positive energy just bursting to get out. Be part of these exciting times, there are already many ways to get involved (some listed below) but there’s always room for new ideas.

So sharpen those pens, dust off the brushes, or have a gargle and get your voice ready. Here’s to it. Scroll down for more information or use our interactive map and lists of exciting museums and monuments.

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Carlisle Catherdral

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Carlisle Cathedral is one of the jewels of North West England and, after standing on the border with Scotland for almost 900 years, it has a lively story to tell. It may not be the best known medieval Cathedral in England, it is certainly not the biggest, but it delights its many visitors.

Worship is offered here every day of the year, with sung Evensong in term time every day except Saturday. Visitors of all traditions and faiths are always welcome to join the congregation at these services. We hope you will come to visit us and enjoy the beauty of the Cathedral and its precinct. There are fascinating stories of faith, hope and love to discover here

Carlisle Cathedral was begun in 1122, during the reign of King Henry I, as a community of Canons Regular following the reform of the Abbey of Arrouaise in France, which followed a strict form of the canonical life, influenced by the ascetic practices of the Cistercians. Many large churches of Augustinian foundation were built in England during this period as the Archbishop of Canterbury, William de Corbeil, was a member of this order, but Carlisle is one of only four Augustinian churches in England to become a cathedral, most monastic cathedrals being Benedictine. The church was begun by Athelwold, an Englishman, who became the first prior. In 1133, the church was raised to the status of cathedral and Athelwold became the first Bishop of Carlisle (1133–55). In 1233, the cathedral priory community were joined by two friaries in the city. A Dominican friary and a Franciscan friary were founded close to the cathedral.[3] The building was refurbished in the 13th and 14th centuries, receiving impetus from the presence of the court of Edward I in 1307.
Cathedral Church of St. Mary at Carlisle, 1783

In the 15th and early 16th centuries, the monastic buildings were renewed. With the Dissolution of the Monasteries from 1536, and the establishment by Henry VIII of the Church of England as the country's official church, the Dominican and Franciscan friaries were dissolved and Carlisle, along with the other monastic cathedrals, was run by a secular chapter like the cathedrals at Lincoln and York, which practice has continued to this day.

During the time of the English Civil War, a portion of the nave of the cathedral was demolished by the Scottish Presbyterian Army in order to use the stone to reinforce Carlisle Castle. Between 1853 and 1870 Carlisle Cathedral was restored by Ewan Christian. In the early 19th century, the cathedral became the subject for a geometric analysis by Robert William Billings.

For further information, visit the Carlisle Cathedral website

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Useful Information and links

A Strategic Framework for Culture in Carlisle was initiated in 2019 by a small steering group of Carlisle City Council, Prism Arts, Tullie House Museum & Art Gallery Trust and the University of Cumbria.  The consultation was designed to not only engage existing cultural specialists but to encourage a diverse range of voices representing diversity, business, education, health, individual and freelance artists and creative practitioners to contribute to shaping the future arts and cultural agenda.

Discover Carlisle has lots of ideas for things to see and do in and around England’s biggest city

"A virtual hub for all things multicultural in Cumbria. Sharing our similarities and celebrating our differences"

    Cumbria Arts & Culture Network 

      Prism Arts

   Eden Arts

   Carlisle Contemporary Arts 

Monuments

There are a number of historical monument in and around Carlisle.  Please see the downloadable Monuments and Memorial Guide below.

Public art

Professional street art is growing in the city as show cased in this Cumbria Guide article.  

  

Landmark Street Art

Venues


The Source Collective  

Theatre and Drama

 

  Rocket Theatre 

Dance